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Editing Name Server Settings

Point To Hosting!

If you bought your domain from a domain registrar and not through your hosting company, you need to change your DNS settings.

This is what tells your domain name registrar where to send your visitors i.e. where to point/forward them to. Kind of like informing the Post Office when you move house.
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If you’ve decided to register your Domain Name with the same company that hosts your site then this won’t apply – but this video tutorial may come in handy in the future, as I explain in the brief audio below:

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Relevant links for this tutorial:

Glossary/Explanation of Techy Terms used in this tutorial:

  • Domain Name: If your website is found at www.Thisisme.com then your Domain is Thisisme.com if your www address is www.Thisisme.co.uk that is another domain and there is not, necessarily, any connection between the two as they have different suffixes. Similarly Thisisme.com and This-is-me.com and This-isme.com etc. are ALL separate domains the hyphens make that so!
  • Hosting/Hosting Company: Your web site or blog has to sit somewhere i.e. on a big specialised computer where it can be accessed when somebody types a www. address into a Browser address bar. Hosting companies rent you space on their bid specialised computers (known as Servers).
  • Domain Name Registrar: The company from which you purchase your domain name, in the examples above it’s GoDaddy.
  • DNS: Stands for Domain Name Server Settings. These tell your domain name registrar where to send anyone who types your web site address into a browser or clicks on it in Search Engine results. In other words DNS links your domain name to where your site is hosted. If you change your hosting company you simply change your DNS settings with your domain name registrar to point to the new hosting company’s Nameservers.
  • Nameservers: Every hosting company has their own Nameservers , which are kind of like their web postal address, and the details of which they’ll email you when you sign up for a hosting account. Normally something like: NS1.something.com and NS2.something.com

Got a question about any of the info above? Let us know in the Comments section below….

Clive

Clive

Managing Director at Big Buzz Projects
Clive McGonigal is a full time Web Developer, Marketer, WordPress Evangelist and all round Decent Chap. He lives between London and France ( on a tiny rowing boat with an internet connection) and spends his offline time wining, dining and conversing with his dogs. He loves WordPress ( themes, plugins and tweaks) and blogs about them whenever he can.
Clive
Clive

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